If a symphony is successful with 120 musicians, why not even more so with 600?

Growth has always been a problem, even back during the industrial revolution and the rise of the production line. Think about it, if you have one person adjusting a screw, adding another person won't make the job more efficient. Or maybe it will, because that person can be in charge of handing the screws to the other person that is actually screwing them. But then, add a third person and what will he do? And what about a fourth one? If growth is the objective here then the solution would be to simply extend the line or open up a new one. But even then, what if you're happy with the current output you're producing and don't actually need to generate more revenue?

A company of one questions growth and stays small on purpose.

It's the little voice in the back of your head asking "What if...?". What if growth doesn't matter? What if I've got enough? Whether you're working on your own or going up the ladder in a big corporation, have you ever thought what enough is for you? Maybe being promoted again will bring more money to your bank account, but do you really need that money at the expense of the added responsibilities, effort and stress of the new position? Do I really want to work for this big client? It'll load me with a full gallon of financial fuel but do I really need that right now?

"Company of One" was the perfect end to the first part of my journey as a developer entrepreneur, through which I've questioned what kind of future I want for myself and my two person business. It's not growth at all cost and it's not taking on every possible client but choosing who to work with and doing meaningful work, slowly growing until I hit my enough.

There's been much buzz lately about working for yourself, and quitting your job being the ultimate solution to all your problems. But beware, it's not as easy a journey as you may imagine. It's one thing to start your own business if you're based in North America or Europe, where you have access to every possible tool and clear legal rules, and it's another thing to do it in South America, specifically in Argentina, where inflation is not 3% yearly but monthly.

If you're thinking on quitting or have an idea you'd like to pursue, go for it, but don't quit just yet. Start it as a side project, work on it on your spare time. And when you're making enough to sustain your lifestyle, only then quit.